Posted in Home Economics, Homeschool Information

Sewing a Ty Lee Costume: Part 2

Last week for Fibre Friday, (Sewing a Ty Lee Costume: Part 1) I promised to show you our finished Ty Lee costume! We finished it this week, before we made the drive to Halifax to enjoy Hal-Con today.

Ty Lee costume

Sewing a Ty Lee Costume: Part 2

To create the Ty Lee blouse pattern, we traced a blouse that fit my daughter well. We had to change the sleeves to make them the bell shaped ones so my daughter drew them out. This was the first time setting in sleeves for both of us and I’m not entirely happy with the seams at the armholes.

We also had to add a Mandarin collar. We used this Mandarin collar tutorial. It was easy! We had already finished the basic collar completely before adding a Mandarin collar though, making a strange seam. I think you have to look closely to notice.

We also cheated a bit because the iron broke. Instead of encasing the elastic for the hem, we ran the elastic on the inside, sewing it while holding it taut (like I did for sewing a cape). It worked quite well.

My daughter cut out and sewed the bracers herself. She also cut out the strips of fabric to wear in her hair.

Here is my daughter wearing the finished Ty Lee costume.

Ty Lee costume

My daughter’s ballet shoes are perfect as Ty Lee slippers. She is a blonde, so we did try dyeing her hair. However, the rinse we used only made her hair a darker blonde. She is currently seeking a brown wig at Hal-Con that she can use in future!

Are you sewing a cosplay, or Halloween costume for your child? Please let me know in the comments below!

Love, Luck &

Laughter,

Kimberly

 

Posted in Home Economics

Sewing a Ty Lee Costume: Part 1

It’s Fibre Friday! We have been working on all sorts of sewing and knitting projects. As you know, we like to cosplay (see our Elsa cosplay here). I am going to share the cosplay we are finishing for Hal-Con in Halifax next week! We are big fans of the animated series (not the movie), Avatar: The Last Airbender. Since my daughter is into acrobatics, she decided to dress as Ty Lee.

Ty Lee costume

Sewing a Ty Lee Costume: Part 1

My daughter started with a design.
Ty Lee costume

Then my daughter and I went on a shopping trip to the local fabric store and found the perfect colours for Ty Lee’s costume.
Ty Lee costume

Next, my daughter cut out some pattern pieces on her own for the collar and the skirt.
Ty Lee Costume

For the pants, we used a combination of a basic kids’ pattern I had on hand and this harem pant pattern we found on Pinterest.
Ty Lee costume

We cut strips to make cuffs.
Ty Lee costume

Then we cut pieces for the skirt, hemmed them, and attached them to the waistband. If we had it to do over again, we would have doubled each piece, sewn around them, and turned them inside out so they hang better.
Ty Lee costume

Here are the finished pants!
Ty Lee costume

Since we hadn’t finished the top before CaperCon, my daughter wore one of her pink tops with the pants. We will be finishing the Ty Lee top this week and I will share with you! Are you working on any Halloween or Hal-Con costumes? Will we see you at Hal-Con? Please let me know in the comments below!

Love, Luck &
Laughter,

Kimberly

Posted in Home Economics

Fibre Friday: Make a Cape Out of an Old Curtain

Fibre Friday

Fibre Friday: Make a Cape Out of an Old Curtain

make a cape out of an old curtain

Last week, I promised to show you how to make a cape out of an old curtain. It’s a quick and easy sewing project. You can make a cape for Halloween or to dress up and make history studies come alive in your homeschool. I made this one a few weeks ago for a local haunted trail; it’s a Halloween fundraiser for Two Rivers Wildlife Park. We’ve been volunteering as a family for this event for several years.

I started with an old curtain. Using my son as a model for height, I cut off some excess length at the top of the curtain. I found that when folded in half, the curtain covered quite a bit of his body. Without any more cutting, I just folded the curtain in half, inside out, and hemmed all around the edges:

make a cape out of an old curtain

I left a small gap in one corner:

make a cap out of an old curtain

Then I stuffed all the fabric through the gap, and turned it right side out:

make a cape out of an old curtain

Next I hand sewed the gap closed using a blind stitch:

make a cape out of an old curtain

If you need some help with a blind stitch, here is a blind stitch tutorial video on YouTube.

The final step was sewing in some elastic a few inches from the top of the cape, on what I wanted to be the inside of the cape. When sewing in the elastic, just remember to pull it taught toward you as you sew, so the fabric bunches up nicely:

make a cape out of an old curtain

Here is the finished cape! It doesn’t look like a curtain anymore:

make a cape out of an old curtain

For the closure, I simply used a safety pin. You could also use Velcro or a nice, fancy closure such as a clasp or chain.

Are you making costumes for your homeschool or Halloween? What are you knitting, sewing, or crocheting this week? Please let me know in the comments below!

Love, Luck &
Laughter,

Kimberly

Posted in Home Economics

Fibre Friday: Sewing a Tote Bag

Fibre Friday

Sewing a Tote Bag

Last Fibre Friday, I shared how I was teaching my daughter to sew as I learn right along with her (she is 10 years old). We started working on a tote bag together and had cut out all the pieces in my last post.

My daughter had a great time exploring all the fancy stitches that are possible on our machine when we made a tea towel and handkerchiefs. She decided to use a fancy stitch to embellish the pocket of the tote:

sewing

I had never sewn a pocket before and found the instructions a bit mystifying. We read them together a few times and eventually figured it out. First we pressed back the fabric at the top with an iron:

sewing

Then we flipped it over, folded it over, and pressed it again:

Sewing

Finally we got to the sewing part, which is always so much faster than all the pressing:

sewing

The pocket had to be flipped inside out. And then of course more pressing, under this time so the pocket could be sewn on the bag:

sewing
And here is the finished pocket! As you can see, my daughter also embellished the corners of the tote bag itself:

sewing

Then we just had to sew together the front and back of the tote and its lining. This went nice and quickly:
sewing

Here is my daughter sewing the lining into the tote bag. Almost done!

sewing

Here is my daughter modeling the finished tote bag:

sewing

I love how great it looks with a hint of the bright colours of the lining showing. As I mentioned in the last post, we wouldn’t use that crazy fabric for anything else.

My daughter decided to give the finished tote bag to a friend for a birthday present. Here it is with a birthday card tucked in the pocket:

sewing

My daughter’s friend absolutely LOVED it! She was astonished that it was homemade. We are looking forward to many more mother-daughter sewing adventures!

Love, Luck &
Laughter,

Kimberly

Posted in Blog Hops/Walks, Home Economics

Fibre Friday: Learning to Sew

Fibre Friday

Learning to Sew

I’m quite new at learning to sew myself, so I only this week started teaching my 10 year old daughter how to sew! As I suspected she would, she loves it!

I started her off with sewing a simple tea towel.

Learn to sew

All it took was cutting out a rectangle, pressing the hem, and then turning it under and pressing it again. Once the hem was sewn all around, my daughter could have fun decorating it.

Then she decided to sew some handkerchiefs for her grandpa for Father’s Day.

Learn to sew

This was done the exact same way, except we cut out smaller squares instead. She very much enjoyed experimenting with all the fancy stitch patterns on the machine:

learning to sew

Handkerchiefs and tea towels make ideal first learning to sew projects. I’m glad I let my daughter experiment with all the stitch patterns. She really knows her way around the machine now.

My daughter loved sewing so much that she moved on to making her own tote bag. She decided it would make a great birthday present for a friend.

She chose some jean fabric we had on hand for the tote and we cut out the front and back and handle.

Learn to sew

Then she chose some crazy fabric for the tote bag lining and we cut out the front and back.

Learn to sew

Next time I will show you the finished tote bag. I am enjoying learning to sew with my daughter! She’s a natural! She has really caught the sewing bug and you should see the list of things she wants to see next. It’s a good thing we have a bunch of hand-me-down fabric.

What have you been sewing, knitting, crocheting, or making in your home or homeschool this week? Feel free to share and link up!

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Love, Luck &
Laughter,

Kimberly

Posted in Blog Hops/Walks, Things to Do, Places to Go

Fibre Friday: Sewing a Frozen Elsa Costume Part 3

Fibre Friday
The last two Fridays, I shared the making of the dance version of a Frozen Elsa costume for my daughter: Fibre Friday – Sewing a Frozen Elsa Costume Part 1 and Elsa Costume Part 2. It’s dance competition season and my daughter wore it today for her lyrical dance solo!

I completed the arms from fabric recycled from my daughter’s nightgown. I was worried about working with such sheer fabric as I’m a beginner at sewing. An employee at Fabricville had a great tip for me – sew it with a layer of tissue paper. That worked like a charm and the tissue paper tore away easily afterward. Here is the arm pattern I came up with after measuring my daughter:

Elsa Frozen costume

We also wanted to add some sparkle to the skirt and sleeves. My daughter thoroughly enjoyed helping out with the painting and spray painting!

Here is my daughter modelling the finished outfit in the snow we STILL have on the ground! It was a very sunny day though!

Frozen Elsa costume

Her brother was kind enough to carry her back and forth for the photo shoot (unceremoniously):

Frozen Elsa costume

I went back to the drawing board for the capelet part of the coronation cloak and came up with this very simple template:

Frozen Elsa Costume

I did still double the fabric, sew the two pieces together and turn them out. I put in elastic at the top to create the collar. I LOVE working with this beautiful velveteen – it was a lot easier to work with than the stretchy and sheer fabrics I worked with for the rest of the costume.

Then I hemmed a rectangular piece of fabric and attached it to the underside of the capelet. I shopped around and found these earrings and attached one to the cloak. The jewel may not be blue like Elsa’s, but it sparkles nicely:

Frozen Elsa Costume

And here is the finished cloak! This is my daughter after she competed tonight, earning a High Silver medal:

Frozen Elsa costume

Frozen Elsa costume

For the snowflakes in Elsa’s hair, we bought big snowflake sequins and attached then to hair clips with crazy glue:

Frozen Elsa costume

So that’s it – the Frozen Elsa costume (dance version). My daughter loved it and I think next up in our sewing adventures will be some non-dance cosplays!

What have you been sewing, knitting, crocheting, or making in your home or homeschool this week? Feel free to share and link up!

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And if you’re looking for some wonderful sewing, knitting, cake decorating, and other crafting how-to video classes, Craftsy is having a big Spring Flash Sale for this weekend only! Discover huge savings on select online Craftsy classes! Visit Craftsy to reveal what classes are on sale, but hurry, this offer expires at midnight on Sunday, April 13, 2014: Craftsy Spring Flash Sale

Love, Luck &
Laughter,

Kimberly

This post contains affiliate links. If you click through and buy, I make a few pennies to help keep up Homeschooling in Nova Scotia.

Posted in Blog Hops/Walks, Things to Do, Places to Go

Fibre Friday: Sewing a Frozen Elsa Costume Part 1

Fibre FridayWelcome to Fibre Friday! It’s dance competition season! I have been busy sewing a costume for my daughter’s Lyrical solo. It’s going to be a dance version of a Frozen Elsa costume. She is a huge fan of Frozen the movie and of the music. She sings the songs all over the house, all the time.

Sewing a Frozen Elsa Costume – Part 1

Once we had decided to make her outfit look like Elsa’s, my daughter had some great ideas for things we could recycle and use. She brought out her old ballet costume (which she had worn so much for dance and theatre, that the bottom had started to wear). We started cutting the skirt pieces off:

Frozen Elsa costume

Once removed, we were left with this:

Frozen Elsa costume

And then we cut off the bottom, leaving just the bodice/bustier part. And of course, Elsa’s bustier is very sparkly, so we bought reflective beads to sew on it:

Frozen Elsa costume

We also bought some beautiful, stretchy fabric for Elsa’s skirt. I took my daughter’s measurements and made my own pattern. I am a beginner sewer, so the stretchy fabric was a bit of a challenge, but I made a mock-up skirt out of some spare fabric first, just to make sure I had it right. And here it is:

Frozen Skirt

It looks great on and my daughter loves it. Now I have to finish sewing all the beads on the bodice and I have to attach the skirt to it. We bought some fabric spray paint and still have to spray it on the skirt for some sparkle.

A bodysuit needs to be worn underneath of course, and we were lucky to find this one at Ginger’s for just $10!

Frozen Elsa costume

Elsa also has sheer sleeves, so my daughter pulled out her Cinderella nightgown, with a gauzy overgown that has a big tear in it:

Frozen Elsa costume

We have cut off the gauzy material and will be attaching sleeves to the bodysuit. So, we still have quite a bit of work to do. I will share where we are at with it next week – hopefully it will be done or just need a few finishing touches as the first dance competition is in just a couple of weeks!

Is your child obsessed with Frozen? What have you been sewing, knitting, crocheting, or making in your home or homeschool this week? Feel free to share and link up!

[inlinkz_linkup id=388136]

Love, Luck &
Laughter,

Kimberly

Posted in Things to Do, Places to Go

Fibre Arts Monday! March 21, 2011

Today I am hand-sewing some costume add-ons for the One-Act play I’m directing and acting in on Wednesday.  I am also still working on the mystery baby pattern (because my friend might read this blog LOL) and my lace scarf.  I do have another work in progress: a summer sweater for me.  I had finished the back and then laid it aside.  It’s in a delicious, organic, undyed cotton – SO soft!  I’ll show you a picture next week 🙂

I would also like to share about an upcoming event in September here on the East Coast: Knit East.  It takes place on the weekend of September 30 – October 2nd in St. Andrews By-the-Sea, New Brunswick.  Registration is being taken now, and some sessions are already filling up.  I would love to attend someday – it sounds wonderful!

Love, Luck &
Laughter,

 

Posted in Free Homeschooling Resources, Homeschool Events

Free Online Sewing Classes with Homeschool Blogger

Homeschool Blogger is airing the final lesson, Lesson 4, of their Beginning Sewing Series of classes on Tuesday, March 1st at 5pm AST (4pm EST)  (Previously it was set to be held Wednesday, February 16th, but there were technical difficulties).  Register now and join in!

If you miss registering for it, or have missed any of the three previous classes, the first three are currently online for your viewing pleasure.  Lesson 4 will be available for viewing on demand within the next few days 🙂

We’re so glad these classes are available, as my children and I are learning to sew this year!

Love, Luck &
Laughter,

Posted in Things to Do, Places to Go

Fibre Arts Monday! Feb. 14, 2011

Fibre Arts are a BIG part of our home and our homeschool.  We handspin, knit, cork, weave, sew, and kneedle-felt.  So, I’m joining Teaching Good Things in posting weekly about the Fibre Arts we’re working on.

This week, I’m knitting the Suri Lace Scarf from Creative Knitting Magazine – my very first lace project!  I’m using beautifully soft baby alpaca laceweight yarn that I picked up on sale at Baaddeck Yarns for just $1.50!  It’s the softest yarn I’ve ever worked with.  I have only knit a few rows so far, as you can see (and yes I am using ridiculously long circular needles LOL):

My son and daughter are combining their efforts on the Cricket Loom they got for Christmas (we bought it from The Bobbin Tree).  My daughter picked the colours for the first scarf, and my son will pick the colours for the next one.  Here it is, almost finished!

Next week we might just have finished projects to show you!  And I’d like to get started on some baby things for a friend of mine who is expecting 🙂

Love, Luck &
Laughter,