Posted in Blog Hops/Walks

Used Homeschool Curriculum Sale (Not Back to School Blog Hop)

homeschool curriculum sale

Used Homeschool Curriculum Sale

I was gathering together used homeschool curriculum off my shelves so we can purchase the curriculum we need this year, when I found out that the 7th Annual Not Back to School Blog Hop added a used homeschool curriculum week! Perfect!

Below, you will find books and curricula in great condition, some still brand new! Preference will be given to those living in Nova Scotia between Cape Breton and Halifax, since we can all easily avoid the shipping hassle and I can deliver it to you on our travels in the next week or two. I will only consider shipping within Canada with PayPal payment, including exact shipping, in advance. Email me at kimberly@homeschoolinginnovascotia.com if you would like to purchase. Feel free to ask any questions you may have in the comments below.
Phonics and Reading

homeschool curriculum saleThe Phonics Road to Spelling & Reading Level One – reg $249 US – Sale $125
Complete Package Includes: Student Binder, Teacher Binder, full set of drill cards, full set of teacher DVDs, all in as new condition. The only thing missing is some of the blank building code worksheets in the student binder which can easily be reproduced using the masters in the teacher binder as well as some of the First Readers to illustrate (17 are still present) as these were used by my daughter. We loved the program but she learned to read and write quickly and we did not need to complete the entire thing.

homeschool curriculum sale

Little House in the Big Woods Reading & Composition Guide – The Phonics Road Level 2 Sale: $40
Brand new, never used. Includes Teacher Training DVD, complete Teacher’s guide, and student package. Reg. 64.95 US PLUS book Reg. $6.99 = Reg. $71.94

homeschool curriculum sale*SOLD*Phonics Pathways: Clear Steps to Easy Reading and Perfect Spelling – 9th edition (Reg $42.99) Sale: $20

 

 

homeschool curriculum saleRead, Write & Type Learning System: Wordy Qwerty CDRom AND JingleSpells CD by Talking Fingers (reg $35 US) Sale: $15.
For Grades 2-4.

 

 

homeschool curriculum saleDisney Princess Reading Comprehension Workbook (Reg $4.95) US. Sale: $3.
Brand new, never used

homeschool curriculum saleStrawberry Shortcake books, $2 each or $7 for all four: All Aboard Reading Level 1, Beginning to Read (Reg. $5.99 ea): Strawberry Shortcake: The Berry Big Storm, Strawberry Shortcake: The Berry Best Friend’s Picnic, Strawberry Shortcake’s Filly Friends Strawberry Shortcake’s Snow Day (reg. $6.99)

I Can Read Level 2 (Reading with Help): Prince Caspian – This is Narnia (reg $4.99) Sale $2

Math

used homeschool curriculum saleTeaching Textbooks Math 5 (version 1.0) CD-ROM Set. These CDs are $99.95 new. Sale: $30

homeschool curriculum sale
Teaching Textbooks Math 6 (version 1.0) CD-ROM Set. These CDs are $99.95 new, Sale: $30

Bible

Homeschool curricula for saleHow Do We Know God is Really There? Apologia (Reg $16 US) Sale $8

Homeschool curricula for sale*SOLD*Colour the Bible: Book 6 – 1 Timothy-Revelation Sale: $1.
My kids had the whole set but they didn’t get to this one, except to scribble in pen on the first page to change “Christ Jesus” to “Jesus Christ” because they thought it was backwards LOL.

Homeschool Curricula for SaleA Tale of Two Kingdoms (reg $21) AND companion lesson book, God’s Unfolding Story of Salvation (reg $20) by Canadian author Heather Kendall – Sale $20 for the set

Logic

homeschool curriculum sale*SOLD*The Critical Thinking Co.: Critical Thinking Book One for Grades 7-12+ (Reg $24.99 US.) Sale: $20
Brand new, never used.

Grade 5 Workbook

*SOLD*Advantage Test Prep Grade 5: High-Interest Skill Building for Home and School by Creative Teaching Press (Reg. $9.99) Sale: $5
Brand new, never used.

Science

homeschool curriculum saleScience Quiz Whiz for Grades 1-3 by The Learning Works (Reg. $21) Sale: $10 Brand new, never used. 128 pages full of tear out quiz cards.

homeschool curriculum saleScholastic Science Readers: Human Body Level 1 – (reg $4.99) Sale: $2
Ages 5&6

Latin

homeschool curriculum salePrima Latina: Introduction to Christian Latin – Teacher Manual (Reg. $18.25) and Prima Latina CD (Reg. $8.95) Sale: $12.
For Grades 2-4. Reproducibles have been torn out but are still present. I never bought the student workbook, everything you need is in the manual.

Usborne Books

*SOLD*Usborne Little Ballerina Dancing Book with dance-along CD – (reg $19.95) sale: homeschool curriculum sale$10 Ages 3+
*SOLD*Usborne Beginners Ballet – (reg $6.95) sale $4 Ages 4+
*SOLD*Usborne Starting Ballet with Internet Links – (reg $6.95) sale $4 OR $15 for the set
Ages 4+

 

Usborne Young Puzzle Books: Puzzle School $2homeschool curriculum sale
Ages 4+

 

homeschool curriculum saleUsborne Fantasy Puzzle Books: Dragon Quest – (reg $12.95) Sale: $7
Ages 8+
homeschool curriculum sale*SOLD*Usborne Puzzle Adventures: The Pyramid Plot – (reg $5.95) Sale: $3
Ages 8+

Usborne The Great Castle Search – (reg $11.95) Sale $6
Ages 4+

Usborne 1001 Things to Spot Long Ago – (reg $11.95) Sale $6 Ages 3+homeschool curriculum sale

Are you selling your used homeschool curriculum? Feel free to post a link in the comments below, and link up with the Not Back to School Blog Hop here.

Love, Luck &
Laughter,

Kimberly

Posted in Blog Hops/Walks, Homeschool Information

2014 “Not” Back-to-School Blog Hop: Day in the Life Week

We’re enjoying the end of summer as we soak up some sun here in Nova Scotia during the last week of August! Yesterday, our international student from China arrived, and we are having great fun getting to know him.

day in the life

When we start back to homeschool, probably the week after next, my 15 year old son will be working on “Grade 11” and my 10 year old daughter will be working on “Gr. 6”. As homeschoolers, we can begin and end the homeschool year when we want, or even school year round. Every homeschool family’s schedule is different. Some homeschoolers have their children do homeschool work for 5-6 hours per day (much like public school), but many others school only in the morning, only the afternoon, or sometimes only in the evening when their working parents get home. Some homeschoolers do schoolwork four days a week, some only four days a week, and some homeschool on weekends.

In our homeschool, we generally follow a September through June schedule, much like the public school. We are flexible, however, and often take a week off around our activities. When either my children or myself, or even the whole family are involved in a stage production, we usually take the performance week off. We also take days off when both kids are involved in dance competitions.

What does a day in the life look like in our homeschool family? In a typical week, we often get most of our homeschool work done Monday through Thursday, with Friday being a time for my children to work on some of their interests or to  tie up some homeschool loose ends. It doesn’t take long for my kids to get through their homeschool work. With neither my kids nor myself being early risers, a typical homeschooling day often runs from about 10am-2pm. This leaves time for my children to explore their own interests and time to head out to extracurricular activities, which we often engage in six or seven days a week! Again, we’re flexible, so if my teen doesn’t wake up until noon some days, he can just get his work done later in the day. Both children will often decide in what order they wish to work on their subjects throughout the day.

Homeschooling really is a way of life for us. We love the flexibility, and not having to worry about the rush for the school bus. Something I also love about homeschooling is that learning becomes a 24-7 occurrence – there have been many times when my children have exclaimed excitedly about learning something in the “off” hours!

Feel free to check out other homeschoolers’ days in the life at:

day in the life

What does a day in the life in your homeschool look like?

Love, Luck &
Laughter,

It’s a “not back to school photo” hop. This time, share your students! All too often, homeschoolers forget to take that token not-back-to-school photo. So, you can wear a backpack and new shoes like the typical first-day-of-school photos, or you can wear a batman costume, goggles and barefeet – like my homeschoolers. Come as you are. First-day-of school photos shared. Linky will go up on Monday 8/19!  Join the student photo hop here.  – See more at: http://www.ihomeschoolnetwork.com/5th-annual-not-back-to-school-blog-hop/#sthash.g2Iw5kz2.dpuf
Posted in Blog Hops/Walks, Homeschool Information

2014 “Not” Back-to-School Blog Hop: Curriculum Week

curriculum week

I can’t believe it’s that time of the year again already! It seems just yesterday I was composing a post for the 2013 Curriculum Week and here it is, planning time once again. I’m still in full summer mode. Surprisingly, my children asked if we could start homeschool early this year! That’s never happened before, LOL. I’m not completely ready with everything we are going to use this year, so I will give you a rough sketch. In general, we are continuing on with our blend of following The Well-Trained Mind combined with Tapestry of Grace in our classical-eclectic way with a little bit of unschooling thrown in for good measure.

For both children:
Tapestry of Grace, Year 3 (covers History, Geography, Language Arts/Literature, Bible) combined with reading & curriculum suggestions from The Well-Trained Mind
The Periodic Table of Elements Coloring Book – we will be continuing to go over the table of elements together, one element at a time, as last year
Rosetta Stone French – we will be continuing on with it again this year – my youngest going at a slower pace than my eldest

For my 15 year old:
Teaching Textbooks: Geometry (need to pick this up when we can)
Henle Latin – possibly continuing with this, I need to have a discussion with my son on whether he is dropping this and just sticking with French this year
The Well-Educated Mind – we are using this as a supplement for our studies of Literature
A Rulebook for Arguments & Classic Rhetoric for the Modern Student (we didn’t find a used copy last year but are hoping to this year) – for our Rhetoric studies
Photography/filmmaking – my son started doing some promotional photography and videos over the summer and will continue to work on this over the year for credit

For my 10 year old:
Teaching Textbooks: Math 6 – we didn’t finish last year and are continuing
Prima Latina/Latina Christiana – my daughter wasn’t keen on studying Latin last year, so we are going to try again this year

And I will be keeping track of everything using The Ultimate Planning System and My Home School Grades!

What curriculum are you using this year? Are you excited about something new you found at a homeschool conference? Join in the 6th Annual “Not” Back-to-School Blog Hop and check out what curricula other families are using:

curriculum week

Love, Luck &
Laughter,

Kimberly

This post contains affiliate links, if you click through and buy I make a few pennies in order to keep up Homeschooling in Nova Scotia.

Posted in Blog Hops/Walks, Homeschool Information

2013 “Not” Back-to-School Blog Hop: Day-in-the-Life Week

Day-in-the-life weekWe’re still enjoying summer as we soak in the unusually beautiful weather here in Nova Scotia! We won’t be starting back to homeschool quite yet. When we do, my 14 year old son will be working on “Grade 10” and my 9 year old daughter will be working on “Gr. 5” this year

Many people assume that a Homeschooler’s daily and yearly schedule has to be the same as the schools in the local school board. If the local public school’s day starts at 9am and ends at 2pm, and runs from September through June, they assume that homeschoolers must adhere to the same schedule.  A homeschooler’s schedule varies widely from home to home.  Some homeschoolers do homeschool work for 5-6 hours per day, while others school only in the morning, only the afternoon, or even only in the evening when their parents get home from work.  Some homeschoolers do schoolwork from Monday-Friday, some Monday-Thursday, and some include the weekends.  While a September through May or June schedule is typical, some homeschoolers opt to homeschool year-round.

Here in our homeschool, we tend to follow a September through June schedule, much like the public school schedule. However, we are flexible and often will take a week off around our own activities.  For instance, when either my children or myself, or even the whole family are involved in a stage production, such as Les Mis this past year, we usually take the performance week off.

In a typical week, we get most of our homeschool work done Monday through Thursday, with Friday being a time to relax before our generally busy weekends, or to  tie up some homeschool loose ends.  We also find that, without 20 or 30 children learning classroom style, we get a lot more done in less time per day.   As a result, our homeschooling day often runs from about 10am-2pm.  This leaves a lot of time for my children to explore their own interests, read, practice their dance, drama and music, or explore the outdoors, before heading out to extracurricular activities. It also allows my 14 year old son some flexibility – if his internal clock is waking him up at noon, that’s fine, he’s just done his homeschool work a little later.

Whatever the schedule being followed, most homeschoolers will tell you that homeschooling is a way of life.  Even when homeschooling has technically finished for the day or for the week, the children will keep on learning, and even excitedly come show me what they’ve learned in those “off hours”, something I love about homeschooling! What is your typical homeschool day like? Feel free to check out other homeschoolers’ days in the life at:

nbts-blog-hop-2013

Love, Luck &
Laughter,

It’s a “not back to school photo” hop. This time, share your students! All too often, homeschoolers forget to take that token not-back-to-school photo. So, you can wear a backpack and new shoes like the typical first-day-of-school photos, or you can wear a batman costume, goggles and barefeet – like my homeschoolers. Come as you are. First-day-of school photos shared. Linky will go up on Monday 8/19!  Join the student photo hop here.  – See more at: http://www.ihomeschoolnetwork.com/5th-annual-not-back-to-school-blog-hop/#sthash.g2Iw5kz2.dpuf
Posted in Blog Hops/Walks, Homeschool Information

2013 “Not” Back-to-School Blog Hop: School Room Week

Not Back to School Blog Hop - School Room Week

Do we have a schoolroom? Where do we “do school”? On any given day in our home, you will find my children reading or doing their work:

in the window seats…

ConnorKillShakespeare photo ConnorKillShakespeare.jpg

on the floor…

MinuetcolouringPeriodicTable-Oxygen photo MinuetcolouringPeriodicTable-Oxygen.jpg

on the couch…

 photo ConnorreadingSep10.jpg

at the computer,  on the counter of the breakfast nook, on their beds, and sometimes even at a table!

We have also been known to work on homeschooling outside, in the park, in the car (on our long trips back and forth to the mainland), at the local Tim Horton’s, the dance studio, or even the Wentworth Perk cafe!

I like the freedom of homeschooling wherever we want, whenever we want. Many homeschoolers who are just starting out think you *have* to have a separate school room.  They spend a lot of money on desks with chairs attached and on items to cover the walls.  This works for some homeschoolers, but a lot of them end up getting rid of the school room desks and even the school room in favour of the couch or the dining room table.  Many homeschoolers don’t have an “extra” room that we can make over into a schoolroom anyway.

If I was to say that we were completely organized, that would be a fib! Most of our books are on our many bookshelves.  I keep my homeschool magazines in magazine holders that we make out of cut-out cereal boxes.  Some of it does get contained quite nicely in binders (by subject), and we keep most of it in a rolling organizer for each child.  We have baskets for our library books and books we’re currently reading.  We still end up with it spread all over the house, but we have a “lived-in” home and I’m comfortable with that!

Check out what kind of “school room” other homeschoolers have, and feel free to share your own at:

nbts-blog-hop-2013

 

Love, Luck &
Laughter,

Kimberly

Second week in August: It’s a school room hop. Tell us about your “school room”. This can be a dedicated space, or what you’ve made work. Post photos, storage ideas, comfy chairs. Your garage? Or dining room table? An actual school house? Show us where you school! Linky will go up on 8/12 Join the schoolroom hop here. – See more at: http://www.ihomeschoolnetwork.com/5th-annual-not-back-to-school-blog-hop/#sthash.7L7f6sIq.dpuf
Second week in August: It’s a school room hop. Tell us about your “school room”. This can be a dedicated space, or what you’ve made work. Post photos, storage ideas, comfy chairs. Your garage? Or dining room table? An actual school house? Show us where you school! Linky will go up on 8/12 Join the schoolroom hop here. – See more at: http://www.ihomeschoolnetwork.com/5th-annual-not-back-to-school-blog-hop/#sthash.7L7f6sIq.dpuf
Posted in Blog Hops/Walks, Homeschool Information

2013 “Not” Back-to-School Blog Hop: Curriculum Week

Not Back to School Blog Hop - Curriculum

It’s planning time…Here we are about a month away from the beginning of our homeschool. I am not anywhere near ready to start thinking about it! We just finished performing in a children’s play last week and are back in rehearsals for Les Miserables for the second round of performances. Furthermore, I am up to my neck in music to learn for an upcoming theatre workshop and musical revue. Phew! I do have a lot of curriculum mapped out in advance, since we are continuing along the same path again this year, and much of what I need for my 9 year old is already on the shelves, having been used by my eldest. We basically follow what The Well-Trained Mind suggests, with some tweaks and additions. So, here is our rough curriculum plan this year.

For both children:
Tapestry of Grace, Year 2 (covers History, Geography, Language Arts/Literature, Bible) combined with reading & curricula suggestions from The Well-Trained Mind
The Periodic Table of Elements Coloring Book – we will be continuing to go over the table of elements together, one element at a time
Rosetta Stone French – we finally bought this last year because it has been on sale, and will be continuing on with it this year – my youngest going at a slower pace

For my 14 year old:
Teaching Textbooks: Algebra 2 (already purchased at Conference)
Astronomy: A Self Teaching Guide
Henle Latin – we are continuing with this (I need to pick up book 2)
The Well-Educated Mind – we are using this as a supplement for our studies of Literature
A Rulebook for Arguments & Classic Rhetoric for the Modern Student (I have to pick this one up, hopefully used) – for our Rhetoric studies

Min-planner

For my 9 year old:
Teaching Textbooks: Math 6
Various Astronomy books (already on our shelves)
Prima Latina/Latina Christiana
Mind Benders – my daughter has zoomed gleefully through this whole series of Critical Thinking Co. books and I believe she only has 2 left!

And I will be keeping track of everything using The Ultimate Planning System and My Home School Grades!

What are you using this year? Are you excited about something new you found for this year’s studies? Feel free to join in the 5th Annual “Not” Back-to-School Blog Hop and check out what curricula other families are using:

nbts-blog-hop-2013

Love, Luck &
Laughter,

Kimberly

Posted in Blog Hops/Walks, Homeschool Information

Not Back-to-School Blog Hop: Day-in-the-Life Week

Not Back to School Blog Hop Many people assume that a Homeschooler’s daily and yearly schedule must be the same as the local school’s.  If the local public school’s day starts at 9am and ends at 2pm, and runs from September through June, they assume that homeschoolers must adhere to the same schedule.  The truth is, that a homeschooler’s schedule varies widely from home to home.  Some homeschoolers do work on school for 5-6 hours per day, while others school only in the morning, only the afternoon, or even only in the evening when their parents get home from work.  Some homeschoolers work on schoolwork from Monday-Friday, some Monday-Thursday, and some include the weekends.  While a September through May or June schedule is typical, some homeschoolers opt to homeschool year-round.

Here in our homeschool, we tend to follow a September through June schedule much like the public school schedule. However, we are flexible and often will take a week off around our own activities.  For instance, when either my children or myself, or even the whole family are involved in a stage production, we’ll likely take a week off.  We get most of our homeschool work done Monday through Thursday, with Friday afternoons at the library being a time to get together with some friends (and from time to time some other homeschoolers), do some crafts and/or tie up some homeschool loose ends.  We also find that, without 20 or 30 children in a classroom, we get a lot more done in less time per day.   As a result, our homeschooling is usually done for the day around noon or 1pm.  This leaves a lot of time for my children to explore their own interests, read, practice their dance, drama and music, or explore the outdoors.  It also allows my now 13 year old son some flexibility – if his internal clock is waking him up at noon, that’s fine, he’s just done his homeschool work a little later.

Whatever the schedule being followed, most homeschoolers will tell you that homeschooling is a way of life.  Even when homeschooling has technically finished for the day or for the week, the children will keep on learning, and even excitedly come show me what they’ve learned in those “off hours”

Love, Luck &
Laughter,

 

Posted in Blog Hops/Walks, Homeschool Information

Not Back-to-School Blog Hop: Photo Hop (and a freebie!)

Not Back to School Blog HopThis week in the Not Back-to-School Blog Hop it’s Photo time!  I haven’t taken a back-to-school photo of my children yet since we haven’t started our homeschooling year yet, but I decided to go ahead and share a recent photo of each of them.

Here is my handsome 13 year old son, who will be starting “Grade 9” this year.
Photobucket
And here is my beautiful 8 year old daughter, who will be starting “Grade 4” this year.
Photobucket
We will be taking our “first day of school” photos at Disney this year as we indulge in The Ultimate Field Trip with hundreds of other homeschoolers!  What are you doing on your first day of school?

P.S.  Clicking on the link or the icon above will bring you to a freebie!  It’s a free History Timeline: Book of Centuries Notebooking System from NotebookingPages.com!

Love, Luck &
Laughter,

Posted in Blog Hops/Walks, Homeschool Information

Not Back-to-School Blog Hop: School Room Week

Not Back to School Blog Hop We do not have a separate school area in our home for our schooling.  On any given day in our home, you will find my children reading or doing their work in the window seats, on the floor, the couch, at the computer, the counter of the breakfast nook, on their bed, and sometimes even at a table.  We have also been known to work on homeschooling outside, in the park, in the car (on our long trips back and forth to the mainland), at the Tim Horton’s, the dance studio, or even the Wentworth Perk cafe

I like the freedom of homeschooling wherever, whenever.  Many homeschoolers just starting out think you *have* to have a separate school room.  They spend a lot of money on desks with chairs attached and on items to cover the walls.  This works for some homeschoolers, but a lot of them end up getting rid of the school room desks and even the school room in favour of the couch or the dining room table.  Many homeschoolers don’t have an “extra” room that we can make into a schoolroom, and that works just fine.

If I was to say that I had a way to keep the schoolwork from spreading all over the house, that would be a fib Most of our books are on our multiple bookshelves.  I keep my homeschool magazines in magazine holders that we make out of cut-out cereal boxes.  Some of it does get contained quite nicely in binders (by subject).  We have baskets for our library books and books we’re currently reading.  Our workbox system helps a little bit with keeping things organized as well.  We still end up with it spread all over the house, but we have a “lived-in” home and I’m comfortable with that!